The most painful aspect of home ownership is the buck stops with YOU.

1

The most painful aspect of home ownership might be that the buck stops with YOU. Whether it’s mundane repairs like replacing fixtures, fixing toilet leaks, and touch-up painting, or big ticket items like new roofs, furnaces, or siding – it all comes out of YOUR pocket. What does this cost homeowners on average? U.S. News and World Report says that homeowners spend from 1% to 4% of a homes value each year on maintenance and repair.

Advertisements

Happy Easter from all of us at Bev Roberts Rentals.

1

Happy Easter from all of us at Bev Roberts Rentals.

Renters Vs. Landlords: Who Wins In 2017?

1The answer to the question of who is coming out ahead in the apartment market – renters or landlords – has been fairly clear for a while now. Renters have rarely caught a break since many major markets began to recover from the Great Recession in 2010.

That may change in 2017.

The recovery years of 2010-2016 saw rent growth rise 150 basis points (bps) above the long-term average, and renters only began to see relief from continual price hikes toward the end of last year. This year promises to show further declines in some markets where rents have risen the most.

Occupancy and Rent Growth since 1998

U.S. Occupancy and Rent Growth since 1998.

Though apartment renting is not a zero sum game, slower rent growth in 2017 is expected to benefit renters more than landlords. Nationally, during the last six years, the average annual rent increase was about $516. It’s expected to lower to about $347 in 2017, reflecting about $168 in savings annually.

Ranking the Markets

The table below shows the top 10 metros with the largest expected savings in apartment rent during 2017 compared to the last six years. The projected savings for each market was calculated by subtracting the annual change for 2017 from the average annual change in rent from 2010-2016. Out of the 54 major U.S. metros analyzed, some 36 showed annual savings ranging from $8 to $2,647, with average decreases of about $360 from the average 2010-2016 price.

Top 10 Savings

Also included in the analysis was a calculation of change in elasticity, which is a measure of how sensitive consumers are to price changes. In this case, greater or lesser degrees of elasticity reflect how renters react to changes in rent. Generally, housing is an inelastic product, which means that the change in price doesn’t substantially affect the quantity demanded.

However, whether a rent increase is considered a hardship or a rent decrease is considered a win for renters depends on the perspective of residents in each market. Where renters are less sensitive to change, the savings or increase may be a minor factor in their housing decisions.

For this analysis, the long-term average for elasticity was calculated and compared with 2017’s figure. If the elasticity value in 2017 is less than the historical average, it is said that renters are getting less sensitive to changes in rent and vice versa.

Trends by Market

Bay Area: San Francisco, San Jose and Oakland, lead the pack for most savings in 2017. San Jose renters stand to pay $2,647 less a year compared to the 2010-2016 average rent, and annual savings will be $2,638 and $1,647 in San Francisco and Oakland, respectively, this year. These markets saw a substantial increase in rent during the last six years, often producing double-digit rent growth that was not sustainable over the long term. The positive change in elasticity value in 2017, compared to the long-term history, points to renters in these markets getting more sensitive to increases in price. The impact of new supply, combined with moderating job growth compared to the last six years, will lead to softer rent growth throughout 2017.

New York: Though New York renters stand to see substantially smaller savings than their counterparts on the opposite coast — about $630 a year — the positive elasticity value for the market indicates that they are more than ready for the decrease. Decelerating job growth and an increase in new supply in 2017 is expected to keep rent growth low this year.

Houston: Houston saw a larger impact on job growth from the drop in oil and gas prices, and continued weak employment numbers may be one reason that Houston renters show the highest sensitivity to price on this list. Houston residents will save about $509 this year, about half a month’s rent relative to the average effective rent in 2016. Though job growth is expected to pick up this year, it will most likely remain well below the metro’s capacity, keeping rent levels lower.

Denver: The Denver market’s performance slowed significantly last year, as rent growth returned to more sustainable levels after being in double digits for most of 2015. That should yield a savings of about $502 a year for Denver renters in 2017. New supply coming to market ramped up in 2012 and still has not slowed, with 3.6% inventory growth expected this year. Weaker job growth this year will mean that the new supply is absorbed at a slower pace, which will continue to keep rent growth at lower levels.

Boston: As with many markets on this list, increased new supply and slowing job growth will equate to lower levels of rent growth in Boston in 2017. Rent growth in the market has been varied since the start of the recovery, but slowed in 2016. Renters should see an annual savings on rent of $441 this year, as compared to annual average rent increases over the past six years.

Seattle: Though Seattle has not achieved the rent growth highs of the Bay Area markets, it also has not seen the same lows in the past year. While rent growth has recently dipped into the negative in Oakland, San Jose and San Francisco, the Seattle market’s performance in 2016 was still strong. Though renters in Seattle will see smaller savings than in other West Coast markets, about $407 a year, they will still get some relief from the rent hikes of recent times.

Portland: The combination of slowing job growth and increased new supply has also caused rent growth to decelerate in Portland, returning to more sustainable levels than the double-digit gains experienced in 2015 and early 2016. Portland renters will see about $356 in savings this year, though the lack of change in elasticity value in the market indicates less sensitivity to rent increases, as renters here may be getting used to paying higher rents than the long-term average.

Austin: Austin was among the markets experiencing the strongest job growth on this list, though that metric dropped in 2016 and will continue to moderate this year. With rent growth responding to the drop in demand caused by moderating job growth, Austin renters will see a break of about $323 in apartment rents. However, the negative change in elasticity value shows that renters in this market are much less sensitive to price changes than their counterparts in other markets. This may reflect the savings that Austin transplants are already seeing over their previous homes in more expensive coastal markets.

No matter how sensitive renters are to the change in price, there’s no disputing that having extra money in their pockets after rents are due will be a welcome change from the boom recovery years.

Source: forbes.com

10 Ways to Be a Great Landlord

realtor-keys-couple-home-landlord-300x214It is upsetting when we get tenant complaints as a landlord.

It is hard work renting apartments or homes to tenants and it takes people skills and management skills. Many times our goal as a landlord is to simply avoid tenant complaints. But there are principles, if properly used, that can reduce or eliminate tenant complaints. Do you know what it takes to be a great landlord?

By Richard Montgomery

Reader’s Question – What makes a great landlord?

Question: Monty, My husband and I own about 75 units in 25 plus buildings.

He has a good day job and I manage the apartments. We have been expanding slowly for over 20 years. This is not easy work. Over the years we have had tenants occasionally complain about different things but we always shrug it off as sour grapes or “they don’t get it.”

Yesterday we got a complaint letter that several tenants signed, which is upsetting. What makes a good landlord?

Answer – Managing apartments is hard work

Monty’s Answer: Owning and managing apartments is very hard work. The environment and working conditions vary considerably based on location and size of the city. As a portfolio expands the management responsibilities expand as well. Management practices must be tailored to the environment, the clientele and working conditions. That said, there are a number of principles, if properly utilized, can reduce or eliminate complaints. This leads to less turnover, less management intervention and happy employees and occupants.

No. 1 – Treat tenants respectfully

We all know high maintenance people. Whether late with the rent, a sharp tongue or simply unreasonable, being respectful can be difficult. There are many resources to learn more about techniques to employ when dealing with difficult people. Getting More is a book that teaches readers how to negotiate respectfully. The National Association For Community Mediation is a place where you can take classes on dealing with difficult people, and YouTube.com has many videos on the subject.

No. 2 – Be true to your word as a landlord

As an example, when you say it will be fixed on Tuesday, fix it on Tuesday. This may sound more difficult to deliver on, than it actually is to deliver. This involves work on the part of the landlord to identify a person, or multiple people, who can deliver on fixing the problem right the first time . They have to be organized and talented enough to stay on a schedule. It is creating a mindset to build an organization the right way. Every person involved in that “being true to your word” process must understand it and be trained and supervised to be able to carry it out.

No. 3 – Keep your property in top shape

Preventive maintenance, timely repairs by qualified people and utilizing products best designed for the job will pay dividends. If paint peels, paint it. When an air conditioner breaks down, fix it or replace it. If you have no funds to do this, then something is wrong. Do you have a replacement repair fund you pay into monthly?

No. 4 – Be picky about accepting tenants

It is always tempting to “take a chance” on a prospective tenant as you want the income. On the other hand, if they move in and become a collection problem you have gone backwards. Review your rent-up procedures and alternate background check services. Most landlords will occasionally get stuck. It is part of the business, but if it is happening too often, you can improve. Also stay up on the latest guidelines from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

No. 5 –  Run it like a business

Many issues that affect some landlords can be minimized. An example is a move-in/move-out report, using it will be a breath of fresh air. A visit on move-out day can often reduce problems before they happen. If the tenant expects you to be there and understands you are going out of you way to help them get their security deposit back in 3 days instead of 2 weeks, most will appreciate it. Include your house rules as a part of the lease and let them know before they sign a lease that you enforce them.

No. 6 – Train and manage employees and contractors closely

When bringing a new employee or new vendor into a relationship with you and your company, an orientation booklet and specific training to set the desired expectation is vital. It is even better if that conversation takes place as part of the interview process. One of the most common complaints in apartment management is often directed toward a specific employee.

No. 7 – Pay your vendors on time

The old saying “fast pay makes for good friends” is an important part of holding a good team together.

What kind of a message does a contractor or employee receive with slow pay when you really need them?

No. 8 – Stay close to the business

It is your responsibility to know how your buildings are being managed.

Being on the premises regularly and talking to employees, contractors and tenants allows you to keep a pulse on the happenings.

  • Are the neighbors getting along?
  • Did the contractor finish painting the floor as agreed?
  • Did the Jones’ move-in go as planned?

No. 9 –  Be fair, consistent and follow through on what you promise as a landlord

When this principle is in place the tenants, employees and contractors know they can expect this level of treatment in a relationship with you and your company.

It is natural that they will reciprocate in kind.

While the tenant does not have the same motivation as the others, it is your job as the leader to mentor and teach your employees to live the principle.

No. 10 – Think like a steward

A steward is defined as someone who manages another’s property.

The idea is to see yourself as a temporary custodian who will diligently care for the property until such time as it is passed to the next “steward.”

And, you want to pass it on as a better property than when you found it.

The examples provided with each of these 10 ways to be a great landlord tips are just one of many examples that could be applied.

Conclusion

The examples provided with each of the 10 examples of how to be a great landd are just some of the many examples that could be applied. It is not easy, but if a property owner practiced each and every one of the ten principles, it would be extremely out-of-place for a tenant or tenants to find a reason to complain.

Source: rentalhousingjournal.com