Do what you love and you’ll never have a problem with Monday!

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We are a family owned and operated business that share a love of leasing and property management. We believe that working together as a family gives us an advantage over our competitors and has been the key to our success. It’s been proven that family owned businesses are more stable, have a longer time horizon and tend to have a high level of trust and commitment to customers, because how the company behaves reflects the family’s personal integrity. We have infused our core values into our company and it shows! As a family owned and operated business, we have a better understanding of our customers values, expectations and needs.

Tenants are like a box of chocolates…

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Unfortunately, many landlords do not perform the easiest part of the landlording process: properly screening tenants. They take in subpar tenants whom put undue strain on the property while rent collections suffer. Choosing tenants is a landlord’s most important (and most risky) decision.

At Bev Roberts Rentals, we have a thorough and legal application process. We search for tenants who meet the landlord’s criteria, and not just the financially responsible one. Not every red flag is a deal breaker, but we have the experience to know which ones are. Want to learn more? Give us a call at (919) 306-5665.

Bev Roberts Rentals: the driving force in the world of leasing and property management

16708250_1344599468896764_6328330447239501757_nOur family, at Bev Roberts Rentals, established a driving force in the world of#Leasing and #PropertyManagement in the#Triangle Area! We broke the industry norm in order to serve our clients the best way possible. If you are looking for a refreshing approach to leasing and property management, our family is dedicated and knowledgeable. We are 100% focused on leasing and property management services, because that’s all we do. We don’t sell homes, meaning we are only focused on your investment property; not selling someone else’s.

#locatedinCaryNC #Raleigh #Apex #FuquayVarina#WakeCounty

Born to Manage Real Estate: Bev Roberts Rentals

1Our family established a driving force in the world of#Leasing and #PropertyManagement in the #Triangle Area! We broke the industry norm in order to serve our clients the best way possible. If you are looking for a refreshing approach to leasing and property management, our family is dedicated and knowledgeable. We are 100% focused on leasing and property management services, because that’s all we do. We don’t sell homes, meaning we are only focused on your investment property; not selling someone else’s.#locatedinCaryNC #Raleigh #Apex #FuquayVarina#WakeCounty

Rental Trends: Five Traits of a Great Property Manager

1A great property manager can be hard to come by. In today’s fast-paced, social-media centric society, consumers and renters crave and demand instant gratification – they are ephemeral.

That being said, property managers must constantly be on their toes and ready to take on anything! Not only must they be ready to draw in and lease to rent-ready prospects, but they must also always roll with the punches in order to satisfy current renters. Leaky toilet at midnight? Be prepared for a call. Can’t find the mailbox key. Better be on it. Locked out of your apartment? Must be prepared! Property managers deal with these scenarios (among thousands of others) on a daily basis.

Here are five tips to being a great property manager that you and your team should keep in mind:

1. Communication

Communication is KEY! Property managers deal with tons of people (at all hours of the day) from all walks of life. Some may speak different languages, have different personalities, different needs and different backgrounds. Therefore, those in property management need to have impeccable communication skills. Staying calm and speaking in a professional manner is a top priority. A lot of times, this includes PATIENCE. Residents must always be kept in the loop on things like office closures, maintenance, payments, etc. Additionally – property managers must keep said communication timely. When a work order is submitted, the resident should be notified immediately that their work order has been received and that the issue is being worked on. When a parking lot is being worked on, residents should know of any alternative routes to take ASAP. These are just examples, of course, but the list goes on and on. Keep in mind, that with communication comes listening. Sometimes, the best thing a property manager can do for a current or prospective renter is ensure them that their voice is being heard and that the community is doing everything possible to make their living situation a comfortable one.

2. Organization

Property managers often have to deal with questions, comments, complaints and concerns from dozens of renters and prospects daily. Not only must property managers make sure their current renters are happy, make sure the rents are coming in on time and make sure that work orders are being fulfilled, but they must also work on bringing in NEW renters as well. Organization comes in handy on a daily basis through things like lease expirations and renewals, background checks, security deposits, invoices, etc. A skilled property manager must be organized, and make sure they are hiring organized staff members as well! If you are impatient, anxious, edgy or bad with tight deadlines and daily interaction with “customers” aka your residents, you may want to reconsider your future as a property manager. Do you think you have what it takes?

3. People Person

One of the best gauges of the level of quality of a property manager is the way they interact with people. This does not mean just their renters. This means current renters, prospective renters, renters moving out, maintenance, vendors, other staff, lifeguards, towing companies, plumbers, carpenters, etc. Managing an apartment community is a large undertaking, and men/women that do not have a happy, approachable, “can-do” attitude will find it hard to not only retain residents, but to draw new ones in. A personable property manager must be able to handle the fast-paced nature of community management and make the process of signing a lease and moving in an easy one. Let’s face it – moving is a drag and a hassle. When people move into an apartment, the last thing they want to deal with is an unhelpful property manager with a sour attitude. That said, go the extra mile to make your renters feel welcome! Perhaps a gift basket with community “swag” when they move in? Maybe a couple of take-out menus from your favorite local restaurants? At the end of the day, a “people person” property manager is always easier to work with than a grouch!

4. Honesty

Think about it. What are all property managers typically doing the first week of every month? Handling other people’s money! They collect rents, security deposits, and more. Property managers need to have the utmost understanding that the renters come first. They must always act with the highest level of integrity. As a property manager, they a lot of complaints are heard daily. While it may sometimes be easier to dance around the issue, a property manager needs to always be up front with the renter – even if it’s something the renter doesn’t want to hear. The washing machine can’t be fixed until Tuesday? Tell them ASAP so they can make other plans. The rent check won’t be deposited for another day? Let them know. Not being 100% truthful with renters can lead to mistrust and lower resident retention rates.

5. Reliability

Having a reliable property manager takes the burden off of a lot of people – the staff, the property owners, the renters, the prospects, etc. When a tenant asks something of a property manager or needs help with a certain issue, they should feel confident that their property manager is taking their struggle into consideration. This can be anything from a missing trash can, a broken lock, a bug problem, a noisy neighbor, etc. Property managers must come through for their residents and should be viewed as someone who can quickly and effectively problem solve. Now, the world isn’t perfect and problems aren’t always easily resolved. However, as long as a renter knows that you, as their property manager, are in their corner and working your hardest to make their stay at your property a happy one, then you have done the best you can!

These five qualities, among others, are staple traits of a great property manager. Moving into an apartment is, let’s be honest here, never the most fun and can make for a very stressful time in someone’s life. Working with a quality property manager can make the experience so much more positive – maybe even fun! An organized, honest, reliable, personable property manager with good communication skills is pure gold!

Source: arlnow.com

Property Management isn’t for everyone, but HAY… it’s in our JEANS!

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Property Management isn’t for everyone, but #HAY… it’s in our #JEANS! #scarecrow #fall#thanksgiving #wakecountync #caryareanc

National Clean Out Your Refrigerator Day

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Use this day to clean out your refrigerator, top to bottom. When it comes to food safety, we fall back to the old saying “When in doubt, throw it out.”
#FoodSafety #CleanOutYourRefrigeratorDay#Germs #BevRobertsRentals

What’s up, “homeslice”? Looking for a Property Manager?

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What’s up, “homeslice”? Looking for a Property Manager?

#RealEstatePun #BevRobertsRentals #WhatsUpHomeslice #Homeslice

How you can make the most of your investment property

1If you own an investment property, you’ll understand how important it is to get everything you can out of it.

But when was the last time you reviewed your investment property?

It turns out, you could be overlooking details that could help give you a greater return.

Here’s three tips that can help you make the most of your investment property.

  1. Hire an agent to manage your rental property 

Managing your own property can take up a lot of your time, and if time is money, then it might be more beneficial for you to pay a real estate agent to manage your rental. Sure, a property manager’s fees could be 5 to 10% of the income from your rental, but for that $20, $30 or even $50 a week you can have somebody that will deal with tenants for you and help you maximize your rental income.

2. Attract and maintain the best tenants you can find

Chances are if your property is attractive and well-maintained, you’re likely to attract more quality tenants. Keeping a quality tenant can save you money in the long run, especially because you won’t have to worry about trying to re-advertise a property when tenants leave. Keeping your tenants happy will make your job easier, they’ll be less likely to complain and they’ll stay longer. If you’ve got loyal tenants, try to keep the rent at a steady level and don’t set unreasonable conditions on them – sure an extra $20 or $50 a week in rent would be good – but it won’t be beneficial if you have a high turnover or vacancy rate in your rental.

3. Claim deductions while you renovate

Renovations can not only boost the value of your investment property and save you money on repairs and maintenance, they can also save you money at tax times. That’s right, renovating your investment property means you can claim valuable deductions on your tax returns. Not only can you claim the depreciation of items such as appliances, carpets and blinds, you can also claim 40 years worth of deductions on any construction costs. According to realestate.com.au if you invest $15,000 in a new kitchen and appliances, you could enjoy up to $5000 worth of deductions in the first five years alone. Before you renovate, it might pay to have a chat with a surveyor or another property expert about what can you can claim and estimate the value of your renovations. Don’t forget there’s also a thing call scrapping deductions, which allow you to claim an instant deduction on the value of household items you throw away while renovating – such as an old kitchen.

Do you have an investment property? Have you tried any of these tips to get the most of your investment?

Source: startsat60.com

Clearing the Air On Companion Animals: What Property Managers Should Know

1Know the rules when residents seek accommodation for emotional support or companion animals

While the multifamily housing industry has become pet friendly, some furry friends are catching the ire of property managers. Residents who attempt to bring their pets on property under the guise of them being companion animals are leaving some apartment operators fearing fair housing issues if they don’t comply.

In a spirited conversation recently on Property Management Insider’s LinkedIn group, some said it’s not worth the risk of legal action to fight a tenant who appears to be purposely abusing fair housing protections in order to avoid paying pet deposits, fees or skirt no-pet policies. Others disagreed, saying that if such situations are handled in accordance with the laws, properties can minimize the threat of a fair housing claim.

“It is important to ask the prospective resident what type of service the animal provides” said Billy Rosenberg, President of Infinity Residential Inc. “If the only service provided is companionship without any additional medical services, the application for request of a service animal can be denied and fees/deposits can be administered.”

Companion or emotional support animals fall within the definition of assistance animals under the Housing and Urban Development’s guidelines, “Service Animals and Assistance Animals for People with Disabilities in Housing and HUD-Funded Programs.” While service animals are generally animals that work and provide disability-related functions (such as guiding persons with vision impairments) other animals can be considered to assist somebody who has a mental or psychological disability by providing emotional support and companionship to help alleviate the symptoms of the disability.

Neither type of assistance animal is required by law to be specially trained, and reliable verification of disability and disability-related need for an assistance animal (unless both are readily apparent or known to the provider) is proof enough. By law, housing providers cannot charge extra deposits, fees, impose type, size or breed restrictions or prohibit the animal from living on premises, even if a “no-pet” policy is in place.

When confronted by a resident who doesn’t appear to have a disability but wants accommodation, legal experts say know and follow the HUD guidelines.

Some residents are trying to get around no-pet regulations

Lynn Dover, an attorney for Kimball, Tirey & St. John who specializes in fair housing law, said companion animals are getting a lot of attention these days. She and the firm have handled a number of complaints from property managers wanting to know what they should do when a resident says his or her pet is a companion or emotional support animal − and may even provide documentation − but it appears the animal is a pet.

“We get a lot calls from owners and managers about people who appear to be using the laws to get around the no-pet rules or the restrictions on the type, size or breed of pets that they are allowed to have, or to get around paying a security deposit or pet rent,” Dover said. “The difficulty is if they provide verification of the disability and disability-related need for the animal, there isn’t much the housing provider can do without subjecting themselves to potential liability.”

But landlords can cover themselves and put the onus back on the resident.

She reminds that residents must make a request for a reasonable accommodation and housing providers cannot ask the nature of the resident’s disability. Verification that the resident has a disability and that the animal is related to and needed because of the disability, unless both are readily apparent, can be requested. She also said that a certificate or other document indicating the animal is a registered service or emotional support animal isn’t enough because these documents can be acquired on the internet without any proof of disability or disability-related need for an assistance animal.

Assistance animals can be held to conduct standards

Dover said it’s okay for housing providers to set reasonable rules of conduct that residents with assistance animals must follow, but the rules cannot always be as restrictive  as some of the normal “house” pet guidelines (for example, residents with assistance animals must have access to all common areas, etc.). If the animal poses a threat to the health or safety of others or damages property, the resident can be held to the same standards as any pet, according to HUD. However, breed, size, and weight limitations may not be applied.

“We recommend having separate rules of conduct, rather than using pet rules,” Dover said. “The reason is that there are often things in the pet rules that wouldn’t be appropriate for assistance animals. Pet rules usually talk about pet deposits, pet rent, restrictions on type, size and breed and restrictions on where a person can take their pets in the common areas.”

Pet rules may not permit a pet in a community room or the pool area but someone with an assistance (including a companion animal) would need to be allowed to bring the animal with them. The animal probably wouldn’t be allowed in the pool, but the pool area is fine, Dover said.

When asked about the most common issues her firm sees regarding assistance animal rule violations, Dover said, “We see people not picking up after their animals, or not keeping them on a leash or other restraint when they’re outside of the unit, letting them run free in the common areas. Those types of things are fairly common.”

Property managers have a remedy when assistance animal owners don’t follow rules

Property managers can take action against residents who violate the assistance animal rules but should do so with a little extra care, Dover said. For example, warning letters recognizing that the animal is an assistance animal, but reminding the resident that they still must follow reasonable rules of conduct, should generally be issued, rather than serving a legal notice that might be used in the case of a pet rules violation. The landlord can state that if the problem persists, the animal may have to be removed.

One exception might be that if an animal has attacked a person or other animal on the property, it may need to be removed immediately to avoid potential liability issues. In any event, the landlord should state that if removal of the animal is required, alternative accommodations will be explored. That, Dover said, can include a request to replace the animal with another.

“If one particular dog barks all the time and disturbs other residents and they can get a different dog that doesn’t have that trait, then that might be a reasonable alternative,” she said. “Similarly if they have a dog showing aggressive behavior, then they may need to replace it with one that doesn’t have aggressive behavior. On the other hand, if the resident isn’t keeping a dog leashed or isn’t picking up after it, allowing them to get a different dog won’t solve the problem. The resident may have to look at getting a different type of animal that can be kept indoors, such as a cat, bird or other animal.” said Dover.

“Trained assistance animals, such as guide or alert animals, usually aren’t the ones that create the problems. It’s more often the companion animals,” said Dover.

When it comes to assistance animals, property managers should know the rules and shouldn’t just roll over. And when in doubt, reach out to a legal beagle.

Source: propertymanagementinsider.com